November 2022 Newsletter

Hi MDA supporters,

This month’s newsletter covers the latest media findings from our recently launched flagship biennial media report, Who Gets To Tell Australian Stories 2.0. We spotlight Brisbane radio producer Dr Eduardo Jordan, who scrutinises the discrimination of journalists with accents. Eduardo also chairs our QLD Chapter, which held a lively networking event last week. We chat with a mentee from our Women of Colour Mentorship, Alicia Vrajlal, and one of the program’s mentors, Cathy Wilcox, who shares insights from her monthly sessions. Lastly, MDA welcomes Lina Ali, our new Admin and Operations Coordinator, to the national team.

In this issue:

  • Spotlight: Executive Producer at The Wire radio show and MDA QLD Chapter Chair, Dr Eduardo Jordan, discusses the discrimination of journalists with an accent
  • New Report Released: Our latest media findings – Who Gets To Tell Australian Stories? 2.0
  • Get to know our program graduates: Hear from WOC mentee Alicia Vrajlal, who is mentored by the ABC’s Talent Manager, Paula Kruger
  • A new addition to our National Team: A warm welcome to our new Admin and Operations Coordinator, Lina Ali 
  • Women Of Colour Mentorships: A heartwarming testimonial from mentor Cathy Wilcox
  • ABC & MDA QLD panel and networking event: Snaps from the event!

Spotlight: Executive Producer at The Wire and MDA QLD Chapter Chair, Dr Eduardo Jordan, discusses the discrimination of journalists with an accent

Executive Producer at The Wire and MDA QLD Chapter Chair, Dr Eduardo Jordan
We need to understand and realise that, as a multicultural country, accents are here to stay, and this needs to be reflected everywhere.
– Executive Producer, The Wire & MDA QLD Chapter Chair , Dr Eduardo Jordan

Do you think a section of the audience discriminates against journalists with an accent in this country? If so, how does it affect the trajectory of their career?

I still believe there is a section of the audience discriminating against accents in Australia, but fortunately, that sector is becoming smaller. The audience realises accents are an essential part of multiculturalism and are becoming more accepting. However, this is not the case for most news editors in commercial media across Australia, who believe journalists should only have an ‘Australian’ accent to deliver the news. Yes, we are seeing more diversity in news and current affairs just on the looks of journalists, but still, accents are considered not Australian enough. 

Having said this, I believe it’s the responsibility of editors and people in leadership positions to change this issue. It’s OK to showcase accents in a cooking reality show, but not in the news and current affairs. In theory, an accent should not affect a journalist’s career, but unfortunately, it does affect it in looking for jobs in commercial media, which is reflected in the newsrooms.

Can you share an anecdote from when you felt discriminated against due to your accent while working in the journalism industry?

At the beginning of my career, I attended a conversation with a senior editor who spoke with journalism students. He explained issues about radio journalism, and everything was well until I asked him a question. It was a simple question on tips to produce radio stories. He said, ‘I’ll give you tips, but I can tell you, you will not get very far on the radio because of your strong accent. Australian newsrooms don’t like accents.’ Interestingly, this news editor started his career in the same radio station I work for.

Accent discrimination has been described as an invisible source of social bias. What steps can audiences take to help stop/prevent linguistic discrimination?

We must accept that everyone has an accent; even Anglo-Saxon Australians have a strong accent. We need to understand and realise that, as a multicultural country, accents are here to stay, and this needs to be reflected everywhere. Editors and people in leadership positions need to realise that journalists with an accent can do the job of a journalist as well or better than an Anglo-Saxon Australian with a ‘regular’ accent.

Our readers include young journalists taking their first steps into the industry. As someone who has worked in the industry, what is one piece of advice you can offer them?

Be yourselves! Work hard, and the results will be noticed in your work. The accent will not be an issue when your work speaks for itself.

Last week we released our flagship biennial research, ‘Who Gets To Tell Australian Stories 2.0’, a ‘report card’ on Indigenous and cultural diversity in television news, with insights into what has changed, what has stayed the same, and opportunities to lead the charge toward greater diversity. 

Who Gets to Tell Australian Stories? 2.0 examines the Indigenous and cultural diversity of Australian news and current affairs television media – and asks – “Does Australian news and current affairs represent the society they serve?” given the latest Census data revealed Australia is more diverse than ever.

The findings show there is some way to go, with a serious need for media leaders to support meaningful and informed adjustments and interventions to build a more representative industry. It is also the first forensic examination of how our media treats cultural diversity at the workplace level.

The report has five studies and, through a combination of qualitative and quantitative data, details the experience and the extent of inclusion and representation of culturally diverse news and current affairs presenters and reporters.

Infographic- Who Gets To Tell Australian Stories 2.0

Get to know our program graduates: Hear from WOC mentee Alicia Vrajlal, who is mentored by the ABC’s Talent Manager, Paula Kruger

What I love most about working with my MDA Mentor is that it’s an opportunity for me to speak in a safe space with someone who understands and won’t be judgmental about any qualms, concerns or issues I face as a woman of colour in the media landscape.
– MDA Women of Colour mentee, Alicia Vrajlal

What is your favourite part about working with your MDA Mentor?

What I love most about working with my MDA Mentor is that it’s an opportunity for me to speak in a safe space with someone who understands and won’t be judgmental about any qualms, concerns or issues I face as a woman of colour in the media landscape. As well as her giving me advice about tackling the harder things, we also have a space to celebrate the wins. Hearing my mentor say she gets just as much out of spending time with me as I do with her felt special and speaks of the power of mentorship programs like this, and I love how the mentor/mentee relationship has evolved in just a few months. 

Outside of your Mentor, which First Nations or multicultural woman working in Australian media do you most admire, and why?

I have great admiration for fellow South Asian Australian journalist Sarah Malik. She has not only worked on serious investigative journalism but also shone in a space at SBS Voices that helps carve out a platform for other diverse voices to be heard. I also admire Future Women’s Jamila Rizvi, who always had time to chat with me back when I was an intern almost ten years ago (and still does). Of course, I greatly respect Antoinette Lattouf, who co-founded Media Diversity Australia. 

What does Media Diversity Australia's mission mean to you?

Media Diversity Australia’s mission means helping create an Australian media landscape that looks, feels and sounds like the diverse and multicultural Australia it is. It’s about allowing people with diverse lived experiences to be heard through quality journalism and media coverage – whether by working in the media or being included in narratives as consultants or interviewees.

Read Alicia Vrjlal’s latest article – ‘You Can’t Be What You Can’t See’: What Sarah Abo’s Today Show Role Means For Arab Women in Australia. 

A new addition to our National Team: A warm welcome to our new Admin and Operations Coordinator, Lina Ali

As the scope of our work grows, so does our team! 

We are introducing the newest addition to Media Diversity Australia’s national team, our Admin and Operations Coordinator, Lina Ali. 

Lina Ali is a Muslim Indian-Australian emerging writer from Parramatta, NSW, who loves all things written and media. Currently, she is studying for a double degree, majoring in English Literature and Politics, and completing a Bachelor of Islamic Studies part-time. In March 2022, Lina was awarded as a Highly Commended recipient of the All About Women of Colour Mentorship Program. As a part of this program, she received editorial guidance and mentorship from Randa Abdel-Fattah and Sweatshop’s Winnie Dunn. Lina’s short story ‘Shaking Hands Suffocate‘ was published on the Sydney Opera House Website.

Lina also received an internship to work as an SBS Diversity and Inclusion Research Assistant and as a Voices writer through the 2022 Createability Internship program, which is a partnership between Create NSW and Accessible Arts and a range of NSW-based arts, screen and cultural organisations, to develop strong career pathways for people with disability.

You can find Lina’s by-lines across reputable platforms such as the ABC, SBS Voices and Meanjin Quarterly. Most recently, she published ‘As a neurodiverse woman, small talk and networking are a nightmare‘ with SBS Voices.

We are thrilled to welcome you to the team, Lina! 

Women of Colour Mentorships: A heart-warming testimonial from Mentor Cathy Wilcox

Our year-long Women of Colour mentorships are well underway. As our mentees’ progress in their professional careers, their interactions with their mentors have been mutually beneficial.

Here’s a poignant testimonial from Cathy Wilcox (Cartoonist, SMH/The Age), who is mentoring Famida Rahman:

“I’m enjoying my chats with Famida. They’ve become less specifically career-directed; she’s between pursuing the professional career she’s highly qualified for and finding ways to bring creativity into her life. She seems to be finding a balance in these things, even while her career options are wide open.

What’s interesting for me (and I hope useful for her) is exploring the parallels we find between her particular cultural background and how she forms her identity, and the process of becoming an adult (in any culture), learning to define yourself on your terms and find your voice.

I’ve thought a great deal about identity in many aspects, and seeking to understand ourselves is vital for determining our life’s priorities.”

MDA & ABC QLD panel and networking event: Snaps from the event!

MDA & ABC QLD panel and networking event

Last week, Media Diversity Australia, in partnership with our media partner the ABC held a panel and networking event at ABC South Brisbane. 

The informative panel titled Newsroom Nuances – Reporting on diverse communities was moderated by Dr Eduardo Jordan with a fantastic lineup of panellists including Visual Storyteller at ABC News, Lillian Rangiah; ABC Asia-Pacific Newsroom journalist Melissa Maykin; CEO of Islamic College Brisbane and multicultural champion, Ali Kadri; author, public speaker and our QLD Chapter Disability Affairs Officer, Lisa Cox.

We thank our QLD chapter and our gracious hosts, ABC Brisbane and Griffith University for running this panel and networking event.

Since its launch in 2017, MDA has introduced state-based chapters in NSW, VIC, QLD and ACT. Stay tuned for upcoming chapter events in the coming year. We will see you there! 

abc-news-logo-01

Want to help create a media that looks and sounds like Australia?

As a not-for-profit organisation, we rely on the help of our incredible volunteers. With your financial and volunteer support, we can continue to run programs to support culturally and linguistically diverse journalists, conduct agenda-setting research, run networking events, provide practical solutions for the media industry, and much more. If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to support the vital work we do, please click here.

About us

Media Diversity Australia (MDA) is a national not-for-profit organisation led by journalists and media professionals. Australia is culturally and linguistically diverse, and our media should be too. Established in 2017, MDA has a unique role as a champion of cultural diversity in Australian journalism and news media. We have a vision for a media industry with full and equal participation for culturally diverse people at all levels.

Get in touch:

October 2022 Newsletter

Hi MDA readers,

Our year-long Women of Colour (WOC) mentorships have almost hit the halfway mark! This month we’re spotlighting the success of one mentee, Pranjali Sehgal, who secured a Digital Video Producer role at SBS during her mentorship with 9 News Melbourne journalist Shuba Krishnan. We also get to know another mentee, Angelique Lu, who shares insights from her sessions with her mentor, Bernadine Lim, Commissioning Editor, Documentaries (SBS). We have kicked off our third annual Summer Fellowships with Google News Initiative. Entries are open to First Nations and multicultural final-year and graduate students interested in a media career, with seasonal placements at outlets like ABC, The Guardian, AAP and Channels 7, 9 and 10. MDA is also thrilled to introduce our new industry membership model, where we invite media companies, educational institutes and industry partners to embrace the storytelling power of Australia’s diverse cultural landscape. We also call on diverse journalists and media professionals who have faced online harassment or violence to complete this short, anonymous research survey about tackling the online safety of diverse journalists. We’re sending a big congratulations to the three winners of our inaugural Chinese-Australian Journalism Secondment program, who have already started making a splash in the media. And finally, senior travel and lifestyle editor Sudeshna Ghosh explores the state of play in Australia’s travel content landscape, questioning the absence of diverse voices. 

In this issue:

  • Spotlight: Women of Colour mentee Pranjali Sehgal landed a role working as a Digital Video Producer at SBS during her mentorship with journalist Shuba Krishnan
  • Entries are open for MDA’s Summer Fellowships 2023: Calling for expressions of interest from final-year and graduate university/TAFE students interested in a media career
  • Introducing our new industry membership model: Inviting media companies, educational institutes and industry partners to embrace the storytelling power of Australia’s diverse cultural landscape 
  • Calling all diverse journalists from minority communities –  we need your help: Please fill in this anonymous research survey about tackling the online safety of diverse journalists 
  • Get to know our Women of Colour mentees: Hear from our second mentee, Angelique Lu, mentored by Bernadine Lim, Commissioning Editor, Documentaries (SBS)
  • Chinese – Australian Journalism Secondments: Congratulations to our three secondment winners! 
  • Why is Australian travel media lacking in diversity?: Senior travel and lifestyle editor, Sudeshna Ghosh explores the state of play in Australia’s travel content landscape, questioning the absence of diverse voices
  • Upcoming MDA Events: Save the date!

Spotlight: Women of Colour mentee Pranjali Sehgal landed a role working as a Digital Video Producer at SBS during her mentorship with journalist Shuba Krishnan

MDA Women of Colour mentee & Digital Video Producer at SBS, Pranjali Sehgal

I’ve always read mentorships can be transformative, but it is only when I reflect on the month leading up to the job offer do I see an undeniable change and the definite influence of my mentorship on my behaviour.

– MDA Women of Colour mentee & Digital Video Producer at SBS, Pranjali Sehgal

“Over the past few months, I’ve had the opportunity to be mentored by incredible the Shuba Krishnan through Media Diversity Australia’s Women of Colour program, and it is safe to say the experience has been remarkable – it even helped me to land a new gig at SBS News as a Digital Video Producer last month! I’ve always read mentorships can be transformative. Still, it is only when I reflect on the month leading up to the job offer do I see an undeniable change and the definite influence of my mentorship on my behaviour. The shift is in the small things, which then ripples to create a big shift.

When I had my first conversation with Shuba, I had just come out of my gig at ABC News and was on the hunt to get back in the newsroom. I remember we spoke of the immense value of networking in media and the best ways to do it authentically. We also spoke of the power of being proactive. We dived into her experiences as a young grad determined to be a journalist who seized opportunities for everything they were worth and even created some when there weren’t any. We spoke of the skills I wanted to develop, the attributes I perceived to be my strengths and what direction I’m treading to grow in. It is rare to find a mentor who not only started their career in a similar position to yourself and achieved success but who is also genuinely willing to share their experience – the successes, the failures, the hows, and the whys – so transparently with your development as a mentee in mind. And then to have that mentor also be a woman of colour who understands the nuances of how I may perceive, engage with or navigate things and has crossed the paths I want to be walking is transformational.

In about a month following that initial conversation, I landed an interview at SBS News (proactively) and remember buzzing Shuba as I prepped for the day. As a now-former SBS journalist and an experienced woman of colour in the industry, Shuba’s insights were monumental in how I approached the interview and the opportunity. Throughout the entire process, she was always down for a chat and ready to lend a friendly hand or a piece of advice if I needed it. The mentorship has unquestionably made me more aware and confident in what I have to offer. It has helped me recognise the things I want to develop, which helped me succeed in the interview and now guides me as I build my way forward in the new role. And even though I’m only a few months into the mentorship, I am far from when I started and can’t wait for what comes ahead.”

Summer Fellowships 2023: Entries are open

Media Diversity Australia is calling for expressions of interest from students in their final year or graduates who have completed a media /communications degree OR have experience in a news-related role (e.g. a student newspaper) and are keen to get industry experience at a mainstream media outlet over the summer break.

The project aims to place 12 final-year students or recent graduates in 12 different mainstream media outlets nationwide.

Our host newsrooms include: 

  • ACT (Press Gallery) 

Fairfax Media (The Age/Sydney Morning Herald), Australian Financial Review, ABC News Politics

  • NSW

The Guardian, Newscorp 

  • VIC

AAP, Channel 9 News 

  • QLD 

The Courier-Mail, SCA Radio 

  • WA

10 News First Perth, Channel 7 News/ The West Australian

  • SA

ABC Sports

Applications close at 5 pm AEST on Friday, 11 November. Successful candidates will be announced in early December after an interview process.

Any questions regarding the Summer Fellowship can be sent to MDA’s Director Of Special Projects, Simone Jordan: simone@mediadiversityaustralia.org

For more information on our 2023 Summer Fellowships, visit our website:

Introducing our new industry membership model: Inviting media companies, educational institutes and industry partners to embrace the storytelling power of Australia’s diverse cultural landscape

MDA Membership

Not only does MDA add and change the direction of discourse in our industry for the better, but they implement systemic changes that will benefit the future of media and the future of so many young journalists.”

             –Head of Digital News & Strategy Network Ten, Rashell Habib

As the nation’s most recognised advocacy body for cultural diversity and representation in media, MDA helps drive impactful change to ensure that the Australian media landscape looks and sounds more like Australia. 

With a track record of driving systemic change and creating pathways, we are pleased to offer our diversity, equity, and inclusion expertise through our MDA Membership

MDA’s bespoke membership program is for companies working across print, broadcast, digital, and everything in between. We empower members through our strategic insights and frameworks and translate our research and advocacy into practical, actionable, and genuine steps towards greater diversity and representation.  

Member organisations benefit from MDA’s expert directory and TalentHub, strategic insights and frameworks to help enrich the mix of faces and voices Australians hear, see and read daily.

Our current members include ABC, AAP, The Guardian, The Daily Aus, SBS, Channel 9, Channel 10, and Channel 7. Welcome to our inaugural members!  

Keen to become a member today? Email us at membership@mediadiversityaustralia.org 

For more information on our membership model, visit our website:

Calling all diverse journalists from minority communities - we need your help: Please fill in this anonymous research survey about tackling the online safety of diverse journalists

Online Safety of Diverse Journalists Research Survey

Media Diversity Australia, in collaboration with Macquarie University and Griffith University, is conducting the first-ever research survey on diverse journalists’ online safety to better understand the extent of online safety and harassment issues in Australia. 

Our survey aims to address three main issues:

  • Online safety experiences of minority journalist groups online
  • The personal and professional impact of trolling and abuse, 
  • The role social media platforms and employers play and where they fall short. 

So, if you or anyone you know is a diverse journalist or media professional who has endured any form of online harassment, abuse and violence, we’d love to hear from you!

Take this anonymous five-minute survey NOW

Get to know our Women of Colour mentees: Hear from our second mentee, Angelique Lu, mentored by Bernadine Lim, Commissioning Editor, Documentaries (SBS)

One of the reasons I became a journalist was that I wanted to hear more stories about the people I grew up with. Ordinary people who had their backstories and histories who might otherwise be overlooked.

             –MDA’s 2022 Women of Colour mentee, Angelique Lu

What have you enjoyed most about being part of this 12 month mentorship program?

I’m enjoying the insights and perspectives I’m gaining from our chats to help me shape and create my career path and decision-making.

Outside of your Mentor, which First Nations or culturally and linguistically diverse women working in Australian media do you most admire, and why?

Lee Lin Chin is one of my journalism heroes. She was the first Asian woman I saw on television that wasn’t on a reality cooking show. I love her accent, the way she commanded authority when she read the news, and of course, her fierce outfits.

What does Media Diversity Australia's mission mean to you?

One of the reasons I became a journalist was that I wanted to hear more stories about the people I grew up with. Ordinary people who had their backstories and histories who might otherwise be overlooked. Media Diversity Australia gives me hope that more of these stories will be heard and covered.

Chinese - Australian Journalism Secondments: Congratulations to our three secondment winners!

Chinese - Australian Journalism Secondment winners

We are pleased to announce the three Chinese- Australian Journalism Secondment winners who have recently commenced their eight-week program at mainstream newsrooms! 

  • Minyue Ding

Placement: The Age

“Media Diversity Australia means a chance for me to be seen. It means I can have an opportunity in this industry as a foreigner. And it also means that I can be the voice for people who share the same background as me.”

  • Jenny Tang

Placement: ABC Asia Pacific

I believe Media Diversity Australia’s mission mirrors the Australian society we’re living in currently. MDA plays a unique but pivotal role in championing cultural diversity in Australian media, and this is a true reflection of society and the world in 2022.” 

  • Yimin Qiang

Placement: ABC Asia Pacific

“Media Diversity Australia’s mission means increasing diversity in the mainstream newsroom and interviewing subjects on stories relevant to the diverse Chinese-Australian communities. In the end, it’s about people, letting people from diverse backgrounds be heard and building better relations between Chinese communities, community media and mainstream media outlets.” 

A big congratulations to our secondees, we are so excited to see you pave the path of journalism, accurately represent your communities and help us create a media landscape that looks and sounds like Australia. 

Why is Australian travel media lacking in diversity?: Senior travel & lifestyle editor Sudeshna Ghosh explores the state of play in Australia’s travel content landscape, questioning the absence of diverse voices

Sudeshna Ghosh, senior travel and lifestyle editor

…the demographic of the average traveller has changed in the past century. You don’t need me to tell you that Australian society is more multicultural than ever, and consequently, so is the average Australian traveller. And yet, the voices in travel content in the Australian media landscape are still overwhelmingly lacking in cultural diversity.

             –Sudeshna Ghosh, Senior travel and lifestyle editor

It was a line in a column by a well-known travel writer in one of Australia’s leading national travel publications that brought things to a head (in my head). I can’t remember the exact story (I think it might have had something to do with hotel buffets). Still, the statement “anywhere in the civilised world” – clearly referencing the western world – rankled. 

The underlying implication is that other regions, such as Asia, which are big on tourism but are home to many developing nations, are… wait, uncivilised?  

What exactly is the definition of civilisation here? Are we ignoring the thousands of years-old civilisations of, say, Thailand or Vietnam, or is it perhaps the oldest civilisation in the world in the Indian subcontinent that we are overlooking in this sweeping statement?   

Don’t get me wrong, the actual column was well-intentioned, and the writer and publication are both ones I personally respect. It was most likely a passing statement that would have been the default language for the writer.  

And that’s where the problem lies. It is no one individual’s fault. It’s the ongoing stereotyping that, like every other media beat, travel content has also fallen victim to – largely thanks to the unilateral perspective it usually offers.  

Modern travel, for leisure, is irrefutably a pursuit of the privileged, and perhaps that is why (English language) travel writing has almost always been from the perspective of a white traveller. A phenomenon that often ends up reinforcing colonial tropes.   

But the demographic of the average traveller has changed in the past century. You don’t need me to tell you that Australian society is more multicultural than ever, and consequently, so is the average Australian traveller. And yet, the voices in travel content in the Australian media landscape are still overwhelmingly lacking in cultural diversity.  

According to TravMedia, the country’s largest travel media community, there are around 950 full-time travel writers in Australia, and upwards of 2000 who dabble in travel writing across freelance and in-house editorial positions. Nick Wayland, the founder of TravMedia, estimates that around 80 per cent of this cohort is white Anglo-Saxon. 

While it’s not easy to get hard stats for this kind of information, anecdotally, the membership at the Australian Society of Travel Writers, reflects an even higher ratio when it comes to persons of colour. Need more proof? You need only look at the bylines in most Australian travel publications.  

Our national appetite for travel is higher than the global average, and in 2022, over 70 per cent of Australians are planning to travel* – as pent-up demand explodes. According to YouGov, over a third of Australian consumers make travel decisions influenced by what they read in the media. That is a lot of people who are making decisions informed by the view through a fairly narrow lens. 

One element of travel content in Australia I am particularly concerned about is the glaring absence of indigenous voices – especially now that indigenous tourism is (finally) becoming more mainstream, and we are getting a bit more exposure to this incredibly rich culture. Wouldn’t it be nice – and truly authentic – to have someone with an innate understanding of this culture tell us the story, rather than yet another write-up on a ‘dreaming tour’ that smacks of otherness?  

I don’t believe that anyone is intentionally not being inclusive in their approach, it’s a widespread obliviousness to the issue more than anything else. 

I also want to state that most of the mainstream travel writers I have encountered throughout my career are among the most open-minded, curious and ‘woke’ people around. It would be hard to do this job without those qualities. But that still doesn’t change the fact that the lived experiences of people from diverse backgrounds would be different, which alone can bring a whole other layer to the content.  

Overseas, the change is already taking place – slowly, but surely. Australian media still seems a bit behind the eight ball, and the change needs to happen through the ranks. 

Remember that iconic 1980’s Tourism Australia ‘shrimp on the barbie’ ad? While aimed at inbound tourists, it helped define Australia and its people in the context of travel for generations. Perhaps it’s time to update it to add some ‘tandoori or satay chicken’ on the barbie?  

*Various sources including data from Newscorp, Nine and Savvy.com.au 

Upcoming MDA Events - Save the date!

  • MDA’s Who Gets to Tell Australian Stories 2.0 Research LaunchTuesday, 22nd November 2022
  • Queensland Chapter Networking event & panelWednesday, 23rd November 2022
  • End of Year event hosted at Canva (MDA members & partners) – Tuesday, 6th December 2022
  • Media Industry Roundtable hosted at SBS by Minister Michelle Rowland (MDA members) – Late Feb 2023

Save the date in your calendar and stay tuned for more details in the coming weeks!

Want to help create a media that looks and sounds like Australia?

As a not-for-profit organisation, we rely on the help of our incredible volunteers. With your financial and volunteer support, we can continue to run programs to support culturally and linguistically diverse journalists, conduct agenda-setting research, run networking events, provide practical solutions for the media industry, and much more. If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to support the vital work we do, please click here.

About us

Media Diversity Australia (MDA) is a national not-for-profit organisation led by journalists and media professionals. Australia is culturally and linguistically diverse, and our media should be too. Established in 2017, MDA has a unique role as a champion of cultural diversity in Australian journalism and news media. We have a vision for a media industry with full and equal participation for culturally diverse people at all levels.

Get in touch:

Bloomberg and MDA Panel & Networking Event

Events

Bloomberg and MDA Panel & Networking Event

14 September 2022

A lively panel discussion and networking evening hosted by Media Diversity Australia & Bloomberg Australia on the evolving nature of journalism against the backdrop of the pandemic.

The panel and networking event “Journalism careers during a pandemic – has journalism changed forever?” was the first activity of the year in 2022 for MDA’s NSW chapter.

Victoria Networking Event

Events

Victoria Networking Event

30 August 2022

Networking event in Melbourne run by MDA’s Victorian Chapter Committee. Special guests included CEO of Media Diversity Australia, Mariam Veiszadeh and co-founder of MDA, Antoinette Lattouf. A night of networking, speeches, drinks and more.  

ACT Chapter Launch

Events

ACT Chapter Launch

27 September 2022

MDA has state chapters across NSW, VIC, QLD and ACT. Our members consist of  journalists and/or media professionals who mirror MDA’s vision and are passionate about creating long lasting impact when it comes to diversifying the media landscape.  

The ACT launch was hosted by the Hon Andrew Giles MP, Minister for Multiculturalism (representing Minister Michelle Rowland). Minister Giles deliverd a keynote speech, followed by a panel discussion moderated by MDA’s CEO, Mariam Veiszadeh and led by some of Canberra’s finest journalists.

Moderator: Mariam Veiszadeh (CEO of Media Diversity Australia)

Panellists: 

  • Nour Haydar (Political Reporter ABC) 
  • Dr Liz Allen (Demographer & Lecturer ANU)
  • Philip Coorey (Political Editor AFR)
  • Julia Kanapathippillai (Reporter Canberra Star News Corp)

September 2022 Newsletter

Hi MDA supporters, 

In this month’s newsletter we put the spotlight on award-winning investigative journalist and author of ‘Desi Girl’, Sarah Malik. We are thrilled to  launch our TalentHub portal which connects diverse journalists and communications professionals with media employers. Speaking of launching, join our upcoming ACT Chapter launch hosted by the Hon Multicultural Minister Andrew Giles MP on Tuesday, 27 September at 6pm and hear from some of Canberra’s finest journalists. As the scope of MDA’s work grows, so does our team! We welcome the newest addition to our national team, Madlen Toumbourou, as she takes on the role of Growth and Development Manager. Our year long Women of Colour mentorships are well underway, get to know our first mentee, Nehal Dalgliesh as she shares insights from her mentoring sessions with broadcaster, author and co-founder of MDA, Antoinette Lattouf. We’ve partnered with RMIT to host a panel discussion chaired by ABC RN Breakfast host Patricia Karvelas to discuss industry challenges, diversity and the future of journalism. And finally, journalist and disability advocate Eliza Hull and best-selling children’s author Sally Rippin have released a ground-breaking picture book, Come Over to My House that celebrates the home-lives of Deaf and disabled families.

In this issue:

  • Spotlight: Award-winning Australian investigative journalist and author of ‘Desi Girl’, Sarah Malik 
  • Launching our TalentHub: A portal connecting diverse journalists and communications professionals with media employers
  • ACT Chapter Launch: We are expanding to the ACT! Our launch event is hosted by the Hon Multicultural Minister Andrew Giles MP featuring a panel discussion featuring some of Canberra’s finest journalists
  • New addition to MDA’s national team: A warm welcome to our new Growth and Development Manager, Madlen Toumbourou 
  • Get to know our Women of Colour mentees: Hear from our first mentee, Nehal Dalgliesh mentored by journalist, author and co-founder of MDA, Antoinette Lattouf 
  • MDA & RMIT Event: Journalism: So you want to be a Journalist? panel
  • Come Over to My House written by journalist & disability advocate Eliza Hull and best-selling children’s author Sally Rippin: A ground-breaking picture book that celebrates the home-lives of Deaf and disabled families 

Spotlight: Award-winning Australian investigative journalist and author of ‘Desi Girl’, Sarah Malik

Investigative journalist & author of Desi Girl, Sarah Malik

What is more important to me is representation and equality, of ensuring there are not only 10 interns of colour, but that there are also behind the scenes leaders of colour in media and arts organisations changing culture at the highest level and involved in decision making and in the highest pay brackets.

Investigative journalist & author of Desi Girl, Sarah Malik 

Your book Desi Girl explores the power of writing from the margins and outlines the complexities of living between different worlds. Can you tell us a bit about your book?

This book is a collection of memoir stories about everything from learning to ocean swim as an adult, uncovering family’s past, about my relationship with travel, reading, work, money, therapy, wellness, loving Jane Austen, buying a first home, language, moving out of home, and figuring out my identity as someone whose parent were immigrants. 

Race and feminism are the lens with which I view the world, so a lot of these everyday stories are told through the lens – what does it mean to be a particular kind of person navigating certain spaces, told with a lot of humour and love. Immigration, gender and race are all themes that have animated me in my work and journalism. To explore how they have shaped my own life and turn that gaze on myself was the next step from writing about other people.

Desi girl accurately depicts the feeling of being the only person of colour in the room and the obvious lack of diversity in the media industry. Do you think this is changing? What steps need to be taken to ensure that our media is reflective of its audience?

At a core level the book is about searching for yourself and finding yourself and I think it will resonate with any person who is trying to do that whatever background you are from. For me it was accelerated by being a young Muslim woman in a post 9/11 world, where who are you suddenly is in the media spotlight in really grotesque and caricatured ways; and that almost forced a process of inward reflection that was a gift in a way. 

I loved storytelling but often the politics of the newsroom embodied the very inequalities we were trying to highlight – from class, gender and race. 

Recently, I feel like Diversity and Inclusion have been co-opted, highly corporatized, liability-saving terms devoid of their original meaning; creating an industry where those who profit from it are sometimes white people and people of colour serve as talent or tokenistic faces. What is more important to me is representation and equality, of ensuring there are not only 10 interns of colour, but that there are also behind the scenes leaders of colour in media and arts organisations changing culture at the highest level and involved in decision making and in the highest pay brackets.Change does not happen gracefully but forcibly and it’s important that the needle keeps shifting so change is not surface level but structural.

Our readers include young diverse journalists taking their first steps into the media industry. - As someone who has worked in the industry, what is one piece of advice you can offer them?

This book is about finding yourself and knowing that the things that make you different are not liabilities, they can be strengths and the source of your greatest power. Sometimes when you are made to feel inferior or excluded because of your difference, you are forced to go through windows, explore the roof and the attic and the basements; it gives you a perspective that others don’t always have and that is valuable. I want young journalists of colour to know that if you are finding it challenging, progressing or even getting started, don’t gaslight or berate yourself. 

 I hope that my contribution opens the space for different kinds of stories to occupy the mainstream and it normalises them and makes people feel seen and it also interrogates the way in which we inhabit space is impacted by who we are and makes that more explicit. I had this huge fear that by talking about some of my negative experiences in the media would jeopardise my career opportunities, and I would be seen as a whinger? Particularly looking at my interaction with white liberal progressives/spaces where racism plays out in much more subtle ways; where you are easily replaced by a more amenable person of colour that can paper over racial dynamics in the workplace, if you complain too loudly. I think so many of us silence ourselves out of fear. But naming those experiences is so powerful because you realise there are common threads with others and you start to see a pattern emerge that is bigger than you as an individual. I think making that discrimination invisible that is exactly how the status quo continues. Change is uncomfortable but it begins by sharing our stories and by claiming space. It’s not always an equal playing field and we need to identify these things to make structural changes to ensure our work spaces are more inclusive. 

Sarah Malik is the author of the memoir Desi Girl: On feminism, race, faith and belonging (UQP)

Here is the booktopia link for Desi Girl

TalentHub

Introducing our TalentHub, a first of its kind, growing pool of diverse talent with multi-level media expertise. MDA’s TalentHub connects diverse journalists and communications professionals with job opportunities and helps hirers find suitable candidates. 

Are you interested in seeking opportunities in the Media industry? Register in our Talent Hub NOW! 

For more information on our TalentHub visit MDA’s website:

ACT Chapter Launch: The Hon Multiculturalism Minister Andrew Giles MP (representing Communications Minister Michelle Rowland) will be officially launching our latest state chapter in the ACT

ACT Chapter launch

Since Media Diversity Australia’s  launch in 2017, we have introduced state-based chapters in NSW, VIC and QLD. We are pleased to be expanding to the ACT  where our ACT Chapter will be run by local journalists, key policy makers and media and communications professionals! 

The ACT launch will be hosted by Hon Andrew Giles MP, Minister for Multiculturalism who will also deliver a keynote speech, followed by a panel discussion led by some of Canberra’s finest journalists and commentators including Nour Haydar (ABC), Julia Kanapathippillai (Canberra Star, News Corp), Dr Liz Allen (ANU & Phillip Coorey (AFR). 

This must-attend event will be held on Tuesday, 27 September at 6pm at the Australian National University in Canberra. 

Get a chance to meet our CEO, Mariam Veiszadeh and hear about MDA’s exciting new membership offering for media, educational and industry partners. 

This free event is open to current and aspiring journalists from across commercial, public broadcasting and community/ethnic media, as well as media academics, industry partners and key policy makers.

Want to attend MDA’s ACT launch? 

New addition to MDA’s national team: A warm welcome to our new Growth and Development Manager, Madlen Toumbourou

Growth and Development Manager, Madlen Toumbourou

As the scope of our work grows, so does our team! 

Introducing the newest addition to MDA’s national team our Growth and Development Manager, Madlen Toumbourou. 

Madlen is a dynamic leader, strategist, storyteller, and project manager in the not-for-profit sector.

With a background in Psychology, Business Development, and Operations Management, Madlen’s breadth of experience includes supporting individuals on their mental health recovery journey, to building thriving team culture, to management of national tenders. She’s also an award-winning chef.

She’s known for bringing diverse stakeholders together to tackle complex challenges, and using structure to help enliven solution-focussed thinking.

We are delighted to welcome you to the team Madlen!

Get to know our Women of Colour mentees: Hear from our first mentee, Nehal Dalgliesh mentored by broadcaster, author and co-founder of MDA, Antoinette Lattouf

MDA is ensuring our voices are heard and our perspectives are shared

             –MDA’s 2022 Women of Colour mentee, Nehal Dalgliesh

What have you enjoyed most about being part of this 12 month mentorship program?

My favourite part about working with Antoinette is seeing how her incredible mind works. There’s a reason she can conquer a million things at once: she’s indomitable, confident, understands that being uncomfortable is the only path to growth, has a knack for taking something that may seem insurmountable and breaking it down so it’s completely achievable… and she’s super organised!

Outside of your Mentor, which First Nations or culturally and linguistically diverse women working in Australian media do you most admire, and why?

There are so many multicultural women in the Australian media I admire, but the one who has always stood out to me is Yumi Stynes. Long before most of us were talking about diversity, Yumi was breaking barriers in the media landscape. She knows exactly who she is and what she believes in. She is always herself and doesn’t try to fit in with any expectations of who she should be. I love her fearlessness and her resilience, and having worked with her briefly, I know first hand that she has an incredibly kind spirit.

What does Media Diversity Australia's mission mean to you?

I’ve always been one of only a handful of women of colour in the room, sometimes the entire network. But MDA is changing that. They’re creating opportunities, a sense of community and support. They’re ensuring our voices are heard and our perspectives are shared. How amazing that generations of people will grow up with diversity being the norm rather than the exception?

MDA & RMIT Event: Journalism: So you want to be a Journalist? panel

RMIT & MDA Panel event

So, you want to be a journalist? Challenges, diversity, and the future — Panel event 

We’ve partnered with RMIT to host  a lively panel discussion chaired by ABC RN Breakfast host (and RMIT Journalism alumni) Patricia Karvelas to discuss industry challenges, diversity and the future of journalism. 

The panelists include award-winning journalist currently working as the social affairs and inequality editor at Guardian Australia, Luke Henriques-Gomes; co-chair of MDA’s Victoria Chapter Zena Chamas, who is also a  journalist, filmmaker and documentary producer plus Melbourne-based writer and frequent commentator on Australian politics and media, Tim Dulop.

‘Come Over to My House’ by journalist & disability advocate Eliza Hull and best-selling children’s author Sally Rippin: A ground-breaking picture book that celebrates the home-lives of Deaf and disabled families

Come Over to My House by Eliza Hull & Sally Rippin

Journalist & Disability advocate Eliza Hull and best-selling children’s author Sally Rippin have together created Come Over to My House, a joyful and inclusive story that features positive representations of families with a  variety of disabilities, and all the ways their homes have been adapted to be more accessible and fun! 

Come Over to My House features a family with dwarfism, an Autistic father and child, a mother who is blind and more, the book uses delightful rhyming text and stunning illustrations to follow each child through their  home. 

The purpose of the book is to spotlight positive and authentic representation of families that are disabled, and illustrated with joy and energy by Daniel Gray-Barnett. Both Eliza and Sally hope that  disabled young people and families see themselves represented within its pages, sending a powerful message of inclusion. 

The poignant children’s book, Come Over to My House is a must-read for families, and is available  online and in all good bookstores. 

Want to help create a media that looks and sounds like Australia?

As a not-for-profit organisation, we rely on the help of our incredible volunteers. With your financial and volunteer support, we can continue to run programs to support culturally and linguistically diverse journalists, conduct agenda-setting research, run networking events, provide practical solutions for the media industry, and much more. If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to support the vital work we do, please click here.

About us

Media Diversity Australia (MDA) is a national not-for-profit organisation led by journalists and media professionals. Australia is culturally and linguistically diverse, and our media should be too. Established in 2017, MDA has a unique role as a champion of cultural diversity in Australian journalism and news media. We have a vision for a media industry with full and equal participation for culturally diverse people at all levels.

Get in touch:

Admin & Operation Coordinator

Careers

Admin & Operation Coordinator

Job Description 

  • Location: Sydney & WFH
  • Contract role 6 months with the option to renew
  • 2 day a week 0.4 FTE (hours can be worked flexibly over 1 week)
  • In person office day Thursdays in Chippendale location 
  • Salary range daily rate of $200 + super (10.5%) 

 

About the Role: 

This is an exciting and unique opportunity to play a key role in MDA’s efforts to promote cultural and linguistic diversity, respect, and inclusion in Australian media and society at large. 

The Admin & Operations Coordinator role will play an integral role in MDA’s day-to-day operational work. 

We offer a competitive salary and benefits, including flexible work arrangements in an inclusive working environment. 

 

Responsibilities include:

  • Maintain MDA Member’s Engagement Tracker, documenting and recording all engagements, payments, and member requests
  • Being liaison point for MDA members 
  • Admin support for organising MDA events (including state chapter support)
  • Process requests for additions to MDA’s expert diversity directory
  • Diary support and management for MDA’s CEO in a timely fashion over the course of the week 
  • Ad hoc admin support as required to MDA national team and state chapters 
  • Working autonomously in a start-up-like environment, supported by the high calibre team, volunteer executive committee, and an influential advisory board.

 

About you:

  • A connection to and deep understanding of diversity issues
  • Understanding and ability to manage multiple tasks in a fast-paced environment 
  • Project management skills and ability to prioritise workload to meet tight deadlines.
  • Self-motivated with the ability to work unsupervised
  • Tertiary and/or Bachelor’s Degree qualification in journalism or a similar discipline
  • Excellent written, verbal communication, and social media skills

Media Diversity Australia believes in equity and diversity in the workplace, and the promotion of a culture of opportunity. In line with our focus on diversity, applications from Indigenous Australians and people from a range of cultural and linguistic backgrounds are strongly encouraged.

 

About Media Diversity Australia 

Media Diversity Australia (MDA) is a not-for-profit organisation championing cultural diversity in national journalism/news media. Founded in 2017 by two journalists and diversity advocates, Antoinette Lattouf and Isabel Lo, MDA’s vision is a  media industry with full and equal participation for diverse people at all levels. 

For further information on this position please email hello@mediadiversityaustralia.org.

We respectfully request that Recruitment Agencies do not submit applications for this position.

August 2022 Newsletter

Hello MDA supporters, 

This month, we’re spotlighting Rachel Evans, our ABC Everyday 2021 summer intern, who’s recently started working as an editor at a youth culture magazine Complex Australia. RSVP now if you’d like to attend our upcoming panel and networking events in Melbourne on 30th August at 6pm, and in Sydney on 14th September at 6 pm, where you can meet like-minded people and talk about all things media and communications. We’re also backing a pledge by Commsgrad, an EdTech platform, to help improve diversity of voice in the communications industry by 2030. And we celebrate four young media professionals who’ve come through MDA’s various programs and are making an impact in the media landscape. Speaking of connecting, MDA has some exciting news to share so stay tuned for our announcement about MDA’s new membership model and TalentHub offering!

In this issue:

  • Spotlight on: Rachel Evans, MDA 2021 Summer intern at ABC Everyday
  • Victoria Networking Event: Tuesday, 30th August at 6pm It’s not too late to RSVP!
  • MDA & Bloomberg NSW Panel & Networking event: Wednesday, 14th September at 6pm, RSVP NOW
  • EdTech platform industry pledge backed by MDA: To help improve diversity of voice in the communications industry by 2030
  • MDA Chapter members achievements: Showcasing our own Kamin Gock  and Farid Farid
  • MDA Impact: We are very proud of two of our MDA graduates who’ve secured their first gigs in the industry
  • MDA Announcement coming soon: Stay tuned!

Spotlight on: Rachel Evans, MDA 2021 Summer intern at ABC Everyday

MDA's 2021 ABC Everyday summer intern, Rachel Evans
As young, ethnically diverse journalists – there are many, many reasons we might harbour certain doubts about ourselves and our ability to succeed in this industry. It’s okay to have and hold these doubts – but do not let them stop you.
– MDA’s 2021 summer intern at ABC Everyday, Rachel Evans

You were one of MDA's 2021 Summer Interns - Can you tell us a bit about your time at ABC Everyday? What is one piece of advice you can offer other young diverse journalists who are taking their first steps in the industry?

My time at ABC Everyday completely changed the trajectory of my career – it was an incredible experience. I had very little industry experience prior to my internship, and I grew so much in skill and confidence in my time there. 

My one piece of advice to young, diverse journalists would simply be to “be in the running”; it’s advice I took from NYTimes journalist Bella Kwai. I almost didn’t apply for the internship, because I truly didn’t think I had any chance of getting it, but in a cliché kind of way I thought of her words – “just be in the running,” even if only for practice’s sake. 

As young, ethnically diverse journalists – there are many, many reasons we might harbour certain doubts about ourselves and our ability to succeed in this industry. It’s okay to have and hold these doubts – but do not let them stop you. Cast them aside, apply anyway, and just be in the practice of being in the running – you never know who’s on the other end. This industry can feel impenetrable at times, but it only takes one co-sign to get you in the door. Don’t give up!

Following the internship, tell us a bit about your career progression.

Following the internship, I went on to work as a casual social media producer for ABC Melbourne, and later had the opportunity to re-join the wonderful team at ABC Everyday as a reporter. I also became a contributor for youth culture magazine Complex Australia, and in June was offered the role of Editor at Complex Australia – which is the role I’m currently in. It has been a whirlwind 7 months! 

Can you tell us a bit about your experience with Media Diversity Australia and what its mission means to you?

My experience with MDA has been life-changing. From the initial stages of applying for my internship, to during my internship and post-internship – the MDA team have cheered me on and supported me. The team took a chance on me when I didn’t have much experience as a journalist, and their confidence in me has meant so much, and made me feel emboldened. In terms of MDA’s mission and vision – that of creating a media industry with full and equal participation for culturally diverse people at all levels – it’s something that I strive to live out in my own career. As someone now responsible for overseeing editorial, it is of utmost importance to me that I champion and prioritise the exposure and development of diverse, young journalists. 

MDA’s vision to champion cultural diversity in Australian news and media means helping aspiring journalists get their foot in the door and provide support, so young POC can stay in the industry and wield influence. It means challenging the status quo to dramatically change Australia’s media landscape for the better. It means listening to  and actively addressing the concerns of an ever-growing demographic of Australians, and advocating for equal participation for all.

It’s not too late to RSVP – Join Media Diversity Australia and our Victorian chapter committee for a night of networking, drinks, and more! 

Get a chance to meet and mingle with our CEO, Mariam Veiszadeh and our co-founder, Antoinette Lattouf, along with MDA’s Victoria chapter members and various media representatives.

Date: Tuesday, 30th August 2022 

Time: 6pm

Location: Garden State Hotel, 101 Flinders Lane Melbourne.

Want to attend the networking event? RSVP NOW at vic@mediadiversityaustralia.org

MDA & Bloomberg NSW Panel & Networking event: Wednesday, 14th September at 6pm, RSVP NOW

Media Diversity Australia (NSW Chapter) & Bloomberg Australia would like to cordially invite you to a lively panel discussion on the evolving nature of journalism against the backdrop of the pandemic on Wednesday, 14th September at 6pm. 

The panel and networking event Journalism careers during a pandemic – has journalism changed forever? is the first activity of the year for MDA’s NSW chapter which has seen new faces join our organisation.

Panel Moderator: Ainslie Chandler, Sydney Bureau Chief Bloomberg

Panelists

  • Gavin Fang Deputy Director, Head National and International & Diversity Lead, ABC
  • Tanya Orman Denning, Director of Indigenous Content, NITV
  • Georgina McKay, Journalist, Bloomberg
  • Amber Schultz, Editor, Crikey Associate
  • Kevin Nguyen, Investigative Journalist ABC & MDA NSW Chapter

Want to attend this event? RSVP NOW!

EdTech platform industry pledge backed by MDA: To help improve diversity of voice in the communications industry by 2030

Australian EdTech platform Commsgrad that provides re-imagined communications career pathways to empower the next generation of diverse storytellers, recently announced its’ industry pledge that acknowledges the current lack of diversity of voice within the industry to work toward tangible improvements across the industry by 2030. 

MDA is proud to throw its support behind this fantastic initiative as we know that the media is a megaphone for culture – it not only reflects but has the incredible power to create and influence social and cultural norms. The faces, voices, stories and perspectives that are reflected back at audiences have broad implications.

While we are starting to witness a palpable push from many newsrooms to have their journalists and commentators reflect the broader community and by default, the wider conversation, more needs to be done to ensure that the next generation of diverse storytellers in the communications industry is keeping up pace.

You can view the full press release HERE.

MDA Chapter members achievements: Kamin Gock and Farid Farid

Kamin Gock (NSW Chapter Stakeholder Relations & Events Officer) 

Kamin Gock (NSW Chapter Stakeholder Relations & Events Officer) 

MDA’s NSW Chapter member and Sydney-based journalist, Kamin Gock was named the winner of the 2023 Andrew Olle Scholarship, alongside Brisbane-based triple j reporter, Ellie Grounds. 

The scholarship honours the life and work of the late ABC journalist Andrew Olle, who was one of Australia’s most admired broadcasters. Andrew presented some of the ABC’s flagship programs including Four Corners, The 7.30 Report and Mornings on ABC Radio Sydney (then 2BL). The scholarship is designed to create career development opportunities for young ABC journalists and to promote the values that epitomised Andrew Olle’s journalism.

Farid Farid (NSW Chapter Secretary)

Farid Farid (NSW Chapter Secretary)

MDA’s NSW Chapter member and Sydney-based news reporter at AAP, Farid Farid, has been making his mark on public discourse this month. Farid asked former Australian Prime Minister, Scott Morrison if possessing emergency powers in secret at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic was a slippery slope towards becoming an autocrat during a live press conference at the National Press Club.

MDA Impact: We are very proud of two of our MDA graduates who’ve secured their first gigs in the industry

2022 MDA political fellow, Khaled Al Khawaldeh

MDA takes pride in watching our past graduates/alumni transform into confident media professionals. Khaled is one of them! 

Former Federal Election Political Fellow at The Guardian, Khaled Al Khawaldeh, has recently been appointed as The Guardian’s new rural reporter! 

Khaled started out by attending Media Diversity Australia’s networking event, where he met and made connections with the team. He then applied for our 2022 Political Fellowship and was one of the three fellows to make their way to Canberra. Khaled was placed with Guardian Australia. When the fellowship ended, Khaled was appointed as The Guardian’s new rural reporter, a position funded by the Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation in a program instigated by the Centre for Media Transition at UTS. Khaled is heading up to Ayr in Queensland to bring his unique take on Australian regional life to a national audience.

MDA networking event attendee, Roseanne Maloney

Roseanne Maloney recognised her love for radio early on in her career. She started writing radio news at the National Ethnic and Multicultural Broadcasters’ Council, during which she attended a MDA Networking event in Victoria. There,  she made connections with MDA’s team and the ABC. Her contact with the ABC led to her working a casual radio role with the newsroom. Now, she’s started a prized cadetship at the ABC! 

A huge congratulations to both Khaled and Roseanne on their  appointments and their perseverance #MDAImpact

MDA Announcement coming soon: Stay tuned!

We’ve been working tirelessly on a new membership offering for media and industry partners. It’s a game changer – stay tuned for details in the coming weeks!

Want to help create a media that looks and sounds like Australia?

As a not-for-profit organisation, we rely on the help of our incredible volunteers. With your financial and volunteer support, we can continue to run programs to support culturally and linguistically diverse journalists, conduct agenda-setting research, run networking events, provide practical solutions for the media industry, and much more. If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to support the vital work we do, please click here.

About us

Media Diversity Australia (MDA) is a national not-for-profit organisation led by journalists and media professionals. Australia is culturally and linguistically diverse, and our media should be too. Established in 2017, MDA has a unique role as a champion of cultural diversity in Australian journalism and news media. We have a vision for a media industry with full and equal participation for culturally diverse people at all levels.

Get in touch:

Political Fellowships

Opportunities

Political Fellowships

Three fellowships worth $15,000 each, that will take place during the federal election and will be Canberra-based for Australians under the age of 30, who are passionate about media, politics and diversity.

The project aims to place 12 journalism students at different mainstream media outlets.

Fellowships are available in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Canberra, and Adelaide.

Media Diversity Australia is calling for expressions of interest from young Australians under the age of 30, who are passionate about media, politics, and diversity.

With the support of Google News Initiative, we have three fellowships worth $15 000 each, that will take place during the federal election and will be Canberra-based. 

  • -The purpose of the project is to place three young Australians in leading political bureaus, including time spent in Canberra’s Press Gallery, during the 2022 Federal Election.
  • The fellowship project will help address an obvious gap in the media: culturally diverse perspectives in the coverage of Australian federal politics. The fellowships will be a rare opportunity to work in the Press Gallery, which is often an accelerant for a young journalist’s career.
  • The six to eight-week fellowship will take place in the weeks leading up to the federal election.
  • The fellowship recipients will receive a weekly stipend of $772.60  to cover living expenses, plus a travel and accommodation allowance (where applicable for successful applicants who are not Canberra-based).
  • Fellowships will commence in early 2022 and the exact dates will be confirmed once the election is called.
  • Fellowships will take place at one major media outlet within the Press Gallery for the duration of the placement.
  • The fellowship recipients will be mentored and supported by an MDA project manager.
  • Training by Google News Initiative is also part of the fellowship.
 
WHO CAN APPLY
  • Applicants need to be under the age of 30 and able to demonstrate a keen interest in, and understanding of media, politics and diversity.
  • Applicants will come from a First Nations, culturally or linguistically diverse background, live with a disability or have an interest in growing diversity in Australia’s newsrooms.
  • Applicants do not need to have a tertiary qualification.
  • Applicants will need to have full working rights in Australia.
 
HOW TO APPLY
  • You must address all of the following to be considered for a fellowship: In 500 words or less, please tell us a bit about you, any media or politics experience you’ve had, why covering a federal election is beneficial for your career and why you should be chosen for a political fellowship.
  • Please also attach a CV and one written reference.
  • Please attach any examples of published journalism.
  • Applications open on Monday, 1 November 1 at 9 am AEST and close at 5 pm AEST on Friday, 26th November. Successful candidates will be announced in mid-December after an interview process. 

Applicants can apply by clicking here (Entries Closed). 

*Please note these fellowships are dependent on the COVID-19 situation and state and tertiary government health requirements.*

Summer Fellowships

Opportunities

Summer Fellowships

Positions identified for First Nations applicants.

ENTRIES OPEN till Tuesday, Dec 6; 5pm AEDT:

  • WA: SevenWest Media (The West Australian/7NEWS)
  • QLD: The Courier-Mail

Applicants can apply by emailing the Director of Special Projects, Simone Amelia Jordan at simone@mediadiversityaustralia.org

Open to final-year university and TAFE students OR 2022 graduates interested in a media career.

Media Diversity Australia is calling for expressions of interest from students in their final year or graduates who have completed a media /communications degree OR have experience in a news related role (e.g. a student newspaper) and are keen to get industry experience at a mainstream media outlet over the summer break.

  • The project aims to place 12 final-year students or recent graduates in 12 different mainstream media outlets nationwide.
  • The Fellowship recipients will receive a weekly stipend to cover living expenses for the Fellowship duration.
  • The Fellowship will take place full-time.
  • The Fellowship recipients will be mentored and supported by an MDA Mentor.
  • Fellowships will take place at one outlet for the duration of the placement.
  • Applicants can express interest in working at a specific outlet, but Media Diversity Australia and the host newsroom decide their placement.
HOST NEWSROOMS
ACT (Press Gallery)
-Fairfax Media (The Age/Sydney Morning Herald)
Dates: Mid-February till mid-March
-Australian Financial Review
Dates: Mid-February till mid-March
-ABC News Politics
Dates: Mid-February till mid-March
 
NSW
-The Guardian
Dates: February 6 – March 10
-Newscorp
Dates: December 1 – January 12
 
VIC
-AAP
Dates: Monday, January 16 till Friday, February 17
-Channel 9 News 
Dates: Monday, January 16 till Friday, February 17
 
QLD
-The Courier-Mail (ENTRIES OPEN till Tuesday, Dec 6 by 5pm AEDT) – Positions identified for First Nations applicants
Dates: Monday, January 16 till Friday, February 17
-SCA Radio
Dates: Monday, January 16 till Friday, February 17
 
WA
-10 News First Perth
Dates: Monday, January 16 till Friday, February 17
-Channel 7 News/ The West Australian (ENTRIES OPEN till Tuesday, Dec 6 by 5pm AEDT) – Positions identified for First Nations applicants
Dates: Monday, February 13 till Friday, March 17
 
SA
-ABC Sports
Dates: Monday, January 30 till Friday, February 24
 
HOW TO APPLY
  • Applicants must be final-year university/TAFE students OR graduate in 2022.
  • Applicants will come from a First Nations or culturally or linguistically diverse background or are interested in growing diversity in Australia’s newsrooms.
  • You must address all of the following to be considered for an internship:
    In 500 words or less, please tell us a bit about you, any media industry experience you’ve had, what mediums you are most interested in working with, what stories are of interest to you, and why you should be an MDA Summer Fellow.
  • Please also attach a CV and one written reference.
  • Please attach any examples of published journalism, even if this is through your university or TAFE newsroom.
  • Applications open on Friday, October 14 at 9 am AEST and close at 5 pm AEST on Friday 11 November. Successful candidates will be announced in early December after an interview process.
  • Questions regarding the Summer Fellowship can be sent to the Director Of Special Projects, Simone Jordan: simone@mediadiversityaustralia.org.

If this sounds like you, please apply now.

Applicants can apply by clicking here

*Please note these internships are dependent on the COVID-19 situation and NSW Health requirements.*

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